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Augmented Reality Could Transform the Geology Learning Experience

Augmented Reality Could Transform the Geology Learning Experience

November 11, 2020

Augmented reality is technology that allows users to overlay information and digital objects onto their real-world environment. Although it is often associated with the gaming world, augmented reality technology is actually utilized in many other industries. Retailers, for example, use augmented reality technology to give consumers the power to virtually try on clothing items or cosmetics from the comfort of their own home. Consumers can see what a specific shade of lipstick would look like on their face without ever seeing the item in person. Automotive manufacturers use this technology to create virtual showrooms for consumers who want to shop for a new vehicle without stepping foot in a dealership. These are two examples of ways that augmented reality has been used to enhance the shopping experience for consumers. But augmented reality can also be used in other ways, including for educational purposes. In fact, geology professors across the country may start to utilize this innovative technology to enhance the learning experience for their students. [https://relaycars.gryffin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/image-131.jpeg] THE CHALLENGES OF TEACHING GEOLOGY TODAY Teaching is never easy, but this is especially true when it comes to teaching geology. Professors who teach geology face a unique set of challenges that professors in other departments may never encounter. It’s hard for students to comprehend some of the complex topics in geology without having physical models to reference. For instance, looking at a picture of a crystalline mineral structure is not the same as being able to see the structure in person. Without this type of physical model, students may not be able to visualize and comprehend the concepts they are taught. However, geology professors often have no other choice but to teach their students without these crucial physical models. These models are expensive, so many universities simply cannot afford to purchase them. Furthermore, physical models typically take up a lot of space, so geology professors often have no room to store them. This isn’t the only challenge that professors face when teaching geology. In other science classrooms, students can typically recreate or observe the concepts that they are studying. For instance, a student in a biology classroom may dissect a frog or other small animal to observe its organs. A chemistry student, on the other hand, may conduct experiments in the classroom to recreate a specific reaction that they are studying. But it is impossible for geology professors to provide students with this type of hands-on activity. After all, there’s no way for geology students to recreate an earthquake, volcano, or ocean current in the classroom. As a result, geology students do not get the benefit of learning from hands-on instructional activities. Instead, these students must learn strictly from listening to lectures, analyzing photos, watching videos, and reading text. [https://relaycars.gryffin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/image-132.jpeg] THE USE OF AUGMENTED REALITY IN THE GEOLOGY CLASSROOM Geology professors may be able to overcome these challenges and enhance the learning experience for their students thanks to augmented reality technology. Students and professors can use augmented reality technology to overlay digital objects onto their real-world environment in the classroom. For example, a geology professor may not have access to physical models of the various types of rock formations and crystalline mineral structures. But this doesn’t mean that students are limited to looking at still photos of these objects. Instead, augmented reality technology can be used to project 3-D visualizations of these objects onto a student’s desk. This gives students an opportunity to analyze and evaluate the object just as they would if it was a physical model. But unlike physical models, these digital objects don’t take up space or cost a fortune. Augmented reality technology can also be used to help geology students learn about large-scale phenomena such as earthquakes, volcanoes, and the heating of the earth’s atmosphere. Students may not be able to recreate these phenomena in a lab setting, but they can observe them using augmented reality technology. For example, students can use augmented reality technology to project 3-D objects that help them understand how earthquakes occur at fault lines where the planet’s plates come together. Students who read about plate tectonics may struggle to visualize this concept, but augmented reality technology can bring it to life and make it easier for students to comprehend. HOW CAN PROFESSORS USE AUGMENTED REALITY TO TEACH GEOLOGY? A group of developers are currently working on a series of augmented reality apps that can be used to help professors teach geology to their students. The apps are available for use on augmented reality headsets, such as the Microsoft HoloLens, as well as Apple and Android smartphones. The first app created by this group of developers allows users to explore USGS earthquake data in 3-D instead of a 2-D map. Using this app, students can learn more about the geometry of the planet’s tectonic plates. This app can also help students understand the science behind how and where foreshocks and aftershocks occur before and after an earthquake. Being able to visualize this information in 3-D makes it much easier for students to grasp this difficult concept. These developers also created the GeoXplorer app, which is available for Apple and Android devices now. Students can use this app to explore 3-D models of various crystalline structures in the classroom. Instead of just looking at pictures of these structures, students can get a detailed look at how these structures are formed and how the atoms are arranged. Students and professors can even take virtual field trips using the GeoXplorer app. Instead of exploring a single rock or crystalline mineral structure, students and professors can use the app to take a virtual field trip to an actual rock outcrop, which is a large rock formation. Being able to virtually explore the physical features of the planet without leaving the classroom can drastically improve students’ learning experience. As of right now, these apps are only designed for solo experiences. But the developers hope to build upon the apps to make it easier for professors to use them in the classroom. For example, in the future, a professor may choose to use their smartphone to project a certain 3-D digital image of a crystalline mineral structure. Then, the professor could invite their students to join the session, which means every student would get to explore the same 3-D digital image at the same time. This would greatly enhance the geology classroom experience—especially for remote students. The developers also hope to add new 3-D visualizations to their apps in the near future, including interactive simulations. For instance, researchers at Columbia University are currently working with the app developers to create a glacier interactive simulation that allows students to see how glaciers grow and shrink over time. This type of simulation will help students build upon the knowledge they have acquired by reading textbooks and listening to lectures. Every geology professor should take advantage of these augmented reality apps to create an unforgettable learning experience for students. [https://relaycars.gryffin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/image-133.jpeg] THE USE OF AUGMENTED REALITY OUTSIDE OF THE GEOLOGY CLASSROOM There’s no doubt that augmented reality technology should have a place inside every geology classroom. But this technology can be used to enhance the learning experience in other classrooms, too. History teachers can use augmented reality technology to help students visualize certain locations or time periods. Using augmented reality technology, astronomy teachers can help students explore the sun, planets, and the rest of the solar system. Students in medical school could benefit from the use of augmented reality technology, too. Augmented reality could give these students the unique opportunity to explore human anatomy in a way that has never been done before. Schools may not need to budget for field trips anymore thanks to augmented reality technology. Now, teachers have the power to take their students to far off destinations without ever leaving the classroom. Students can explore the pyramids of Egypt one day before jetting off to Machu Picchu in Peru. Students of all ages can benefit from augmented reality technology. In fact, there are a number of augmented reality apps that are designed to help students in elementary school learn basic counting and reading skills. Other apps are designed to help elementary school children stay physically active. For example, physical education teachers can project digital objects onto the wall of a gymnasium and encourage their students to throw balls at the wall to hit as many digital objects as they can. Augmented reality is still a fairly new technology, so educators may find even more new and exciting ways to use this technology as it continues to grow in popularity. But for now, it’s safe to say that augmented reality may make it easier—and more fun—than ever before for students to study geology.

How GM is Making Driving Safer with Augmentative and Virtual Reality

How GM is Making Driving Safer with Augmentative and Virtual Reality

November 9, 2020

Augmentative reality and virtual reality has been making waves in the automotive industry for years, and General Motors has taken the revolutionary technology one step further. The leading auto retailer is making the manufacturing, buying, and driving processes safer and more enjoyable for everyone using AR/VR capabilities. Read on to learn how GM is using augmentative and virtual reality to reach customers and improve the driving experience. WHAT IS AUGMENTED REALITY? If you remember the digital explosion that was Pokemon Go, you’ve been exposed to the basic idea of augmentative reality. This technology uses digital visual elements superimposed over the user’s line of sight to enhance the real-life experience with responsive, mobilly accessible digital elements. In the auto industry, this technology is being used to help manufacturers and drivers interact with cars using a higher level of detail and control – without blocking or impeding their line of sight. In GM vehicles, drivers can use augmented reality from their smartphones to shop for vehicles in a higher level of detail than ever before. Additionally, amid the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, this same technology is being used to connect designers, sellers, manufacturers, and potential buyers without the need for a brick-and-mortar dealership. This phenomenon can be made possible using mobile apps, responsive in-person demonstrations, or even reactive imagery via any internet-connected device. [https://relaycars.gryffin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/image-127.jpeg] WHAT IS VIRTUAL REALITY? While augmented reality works by combining reality and a virtual landscape seamlessly, virtual reality involves a completely manufactured digital environment that is independent from the real world. Virtual reality technology often uses auxiliary equipment, such as sensory-cancelling headsets, to remove the user from reality in order to transport them to a digitally created environment. This can be used to make video games more realistic, or to improve the accuracy of training and educational programs. In the automotive industry, car makers and technicians can test vehicles virtually without the need for a full outdoor course. This has great potential to improve safety, while saving money by lowering overhead and reducing operational costs for the manufacturer. Virtual reality is also being used by leading automakers to improve the passenger experience by providing them with safe, fully immersive entertainment. Everyone in the vehicle (with the exception of who’s in the driver’s seat) can dive into realistic games, videos, and even music by removing themselves from the “real world.” Passengers can truly enter a completely digital landscape using connected headsets, glasses, or even their mobile phone. [https://relaycars.gryffin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/image-128.jpeg] AUGMENTATIVE REALITY IN THE MANUFACTURING PROCESS Leading car brands like GM are using augmented reality to save money, increase safety, and streamline processes across the entire manufacturing process. This technology has made it easier than ever before for remote employees, onsite employees, and digital elements to communicate from any physical location. Allowing technicians to work on realistic digital models using augmented reality has reduced costs associated with operations by giving remote employees even more agency and control. This lowers the amount car retailers need to spend on office space, as well as equipment required for physical models as opposed to digital renders. Augmented reality has greatly improved the auto manufacturing process in three key ways. TESTING Vehicle safety and operational testing is easily the most critical part in the manufacturing process. Since augmented reality superimposes digital elements over actual sensor points and physical cues, workers don’t need to use physical test vehicles or drive tracks. Additionally, digital renders can be created to show how the car can perform in different terrains and driving conditions. Eliminating the need to test physical vehicle models in dangerous environments makes the process accurate, but safer, for everyone involved. PROCESS AUTOMATION Traditionally, the auto manufacturing process has been expensive and variable, leading to a dramatic shift in value and innovation across the industry. Working in a secure digital environment makes it easier to determine whether or not employees are staying on task, while reducing the amount of time workers spend on repetitive, rote tasks. Augmented reality systems are able to track a dynamic production schedule, while controlling machines remotely to increase the amount of time workers are able to spend on creative engineering and tasks that require human innovation. Additionally, AR-enabled tools can provide assistance and training in the absence of a human manager or educator. This reduces company spend on employment costs, while giving each worker control over their learning speed and style. On demand digital assistance, corporate training resources, and communication tools give workers more power to utilize their unique skills to help the company grow as a whole. STREAMLINED PRODUCTION Social distancing measures have largely limited workers’ ability to collaborate efficiently. Augmented reality has made it easier than ever for technicians, designers, and retailers to collaborate effectively on new models. By building and connecting individual parts digitally, technicians have more control than ever on the models they’re working on. Augmented reality gives them the ability to zoom into small details, manipulate the positioning of individual parts and features, and test functionalities virtually using responsive visual elements. HOW IS AR/VR IMPROVING DRIVER SAFETY? How many times have you taken your eyes off the road to check your GPS navigation or find driving directions? Just a few seconds with your attention off the road is all it takes for a devastating accident to change (or take) your life. Augmented reality gives drivers a way to see upcoming accident alerts, road construction, blockages, and even nearby businesses without taking their view off of their windshield. Augmented reality is also changing in-car entertainment for the better. Drivers no longer need to distract themselves with changing the radio station or adjusting the temperature in the vehicle. Now, augmented reality shows all of these features in the driver’s natural line of sight using visual projections that appear on the road. Additionally, voice-controlled technology makes it easier than ever for driver’s to enjoy a fully hands-free experience. Although we all need to pass a test to get a driver’s license, it’s no surprise that many drivers forget the rules of the road over time. Auto manufacturers like GM have developed realistic road simulators using virtual reality to help drivers sharpen their real-life skills, without the real-life risk. Whether it’s being used in the road or off the street, augmented and virtual reality technology has reduced driver risk significantly in just a few short years. [https://relaycars.gryffin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/image-129.jpeg] WHAT IS A VIRTUAL REALITY SHOWROOM? The Coronavirus has changed the way Americans interact with commercial brands in a major way, and the auto industry has responded by increasing their virtual shopping tools to boost sales. General Motors is just one of the brands that has created digital showrooms with virtual and augmented reality to allow prospective buyers to shop safely from home. A virtual showroom is essentially what it sounds like. Using their desktop or mobile device, shoppers can tour all of the retailer’s inventory using 360-degree product photography and interactive digital renders of their prospective purchase. Fewer automotive shoppers are heading to the dealership, and this has opened up a major opportunity for AR/VR tech to enter the market. Now, buyers can complete the entire buying process in just a few minutes – from their initial research period to applying for financing. As more businesses respond to the changes caused by the ongoing pandemic, augmentative and virtual reality is becoming integrated into the showrooms of large and small companies across the auto industry. Using a virtual showroom eliminates the need for dealers to keep a vast physical inventory on site, dramatically cutting overhead costs and the need for a large commercial space. [https://relaycars.gryffin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/image-130.jpeg] VIRTUAL AND AUGMENTATIVE REALITY DRIVING FUTURE PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT When it comes to product innovation, AR/VR tech has helped developers perfect upcoming vehicle models in far less time. GM is using augmentative and virtual reality capabilities to fine tune their products and provide buyers with an even more reliable shopping (and driving) experience. Before digitally rendered models eliminated the need for physical product testing, bugs had to be predominately addressed with trial and error. Multiple physical testing trials and recalls could be necessary to improve the car’s features, from aesthetic changes to safety measures. Now, cars are hitting the marketplace with fewer design and functionality flaws because they’ll be released after rigorous virtual testing and prototype development. Instead of building costly prototypes to make these adjustments, technicians can work on an infinite number of virtual models until the product meets set specifications. Additionally, virtual reality tools allow designers and technicians to immerse themselves in their work environments without spending time in an expensive lab or warehouse. Augmentative and virtual reality technology is making waves across a wide variety of industries, but the automotive sphere is largely paving the way. GM is using this growing tech system to keep their staff, and buyers, safer than ever before while also reducing costs and boosting value for the corporation as a whole. Immersive media is likely to become the next major medium for consumers and companies to interact and communicate, no matter their location. Take a closer look at how high-quality automotive images and responsive mobile applications are helping auto shoppers and manufacturers go through each transaction with more safety and ease.

How Dogs are Using Augmented Reality Goggles in U.S. Army Trials

How Dogs are Using Augmented Reality Goggles in U.S. Army Trials

November 6, 2020

In recent prototype tests conducted by the U.S. Army Research Laboratory, combat dogs have been using augmented reality goggles developed by Command Sight to enhance their support services. This technology is actively being developed to help dogs safely perform deployment tasks without the need for a trainer to be close by. Removing the need for hand signals and physical cues allows trainers to give commands remotely, while providing the dogs with a higher level of support. [https://relaycars.gryffin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/image-123.jpeg] AUGMENTED REALITY TECHNOLOGY FOR MILITARY DOGS Command Sight has been working on developing AR technology for working combat dogs since 2017. Founder Dr. A.J. Peper started this small company to help military service dogs receive and respond to instructions from their handlers. In fact, most of the initial research has been performed using Peper’s own pet, which is a Rottweiler named Mater. Using the AR-enabled goggles, dogs can determine the location of a possible explosives cache or enemy troops using guides and cues displayed in their eye line. Removing the use of conspicuous hand signals and laser commands protects both the Army handler and the dog from enemy attention. Augmented reality is also a more discrete and flexible replacement for audio cues, such as walkie-talkies and verbal commands. Initial U.S. Army trials with augmented reality goggles for dogs have determined that trained animals are able to recognize highlighted digital elements that are within their natural line of sight. This eliminates confusion, without the need for attention-grabbing commands that can put the dog and handler in immediate danger. [https://relaycars.gryffin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/image-124.jpeg] IMPROVED SAFETY FOR SOLDIERS Combat dogs have played a major role in the military for decades. From drug and explosive detection to strategic attacks, military dogs are a vital asset across every branch of the U.S. armed forces. However, traditional training techniques leave dogs and their handler’s vulnerable to distraction and detection. Dogs typically rely on hand signals, verbal commands, and tactile cues to respond to commands. This can cause problems when a dog’s assistance is needed in the field. Hand and voice signalling puts handlers at risk of unwanted attention, and external factors can heavily impact a soldier’s ability to successfully communicate with their combat dog. Using virtual cues creates a buffer for dogs and their handlers in the event of a rescue operation or other dangerous scenario. This will also increase the level of support dogs are able to give soldiers, by reducing the need for their handlers to join them side-by-side in combat. Due to their heightened sense of smell and hearing, dogs perform exceedingly well in explosive hunts and operations involving dangerous materials. Giving commands virtually over the dog’s active line of sight helps them to do their jobs unobstructed, and without endangering their human handlers. [https://relaycars.gryffin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/image-125.jpeg] INCREASED PROTECTION FOR COMBAT DOGS While dogs are better equipped for a wide range of combat tasks and operations, risk to military animals should always be minimized as much as possible. US Army trials augmented reality goggles for dogs have shown that AR gives dogs more autonomy, while also reducing the risk of collateral damage. Using augmented reality goggles as a training tool allows handlers to give commands remotely, independent of their location. Instead of staying within the dog’s line of sight, soldiers can communicate with their dogs virtually. This eliminates the handler’s need to join their dogs in dangerous or volatile situations. Additionally, this protects the dogs by preventing additional attention from putting them in harm’s way. Dogs can use augmented reality to receive directions in real time without physically connecting with their handler. This is especially helpful when either party is in the midst of a dangerous environment. Outfitting cameras at eye level and using dynamic reporting allows military dogs and their handlers to effectively: * Process commands discreetly * Communicate in real time * Maintain location independence * Improve onsite security Combat dogs are essential for domestic and international military operations, and augmented reality goggles are just another tool that’s helping to make their jobs safer and easier. ENHANCING CURRENT WEARABLE EQUIPMENT The concept of using wearable technology for combat animals isn’t brand new. In fact, military dogs have been accustomed to using goggles as protective gear for a while. Protective eye and headwear is used to protect combat dogs from environmental hazards, shrapnel, and even air drops. Since military dogs are already used to the look and feel of goggles, adding augmented reality capabilities has been a fairly seamless transition. Now, dogs are being trained to recognize visual commands through the goggles as an augmented reality projection. This has proven to be even more effective than silent cues like laser pointers, since lasers aren’t able to bend around corners. Instead, dogs have a more accurate sense of direction using illuminated or highlighted focus points through their AR-equipped goggle headset. By using the visual information from the dog’s goggles, U.S. Army handlers are able to key points of interest. These subtle details can mean the difference between life and death for the soldier or the dog. With the assistance of augmented reality in a real-life situation, handlers and dogs can be protected from hostile attacks and active fire. As the U.S. Army trials augmented reality goggles for dogs, military service animals are being given a way to build their skill sets safely and out of harm’s way. SIMPLIFIED TRAINING AND COMMUNICATION Training and command implementation are the most important aspects of using working dogs effectively in a combat environment. When it comes to communication between military dogs and their handlers, less is more and every second counts. Augmented reality goggles give combat dogs clearer and more direct commands, without confusion caused by: * Device interference * Physical barriers * Presence of enemy soldiers or equipments * Distractions In a dynamic and volatile combat environment, soldiers and their service dogs can not afford to waste any time on misfired or distracting command methods. They also can’t afford to risk giving up their position or physical location as a result of conspicuous communication tactics. Once fully wireless augmented reality goggle technology is available for the U.S. military, deployments and domestic operations will become safer and more efficient for everyone involved. AUGMENTED REALITY PROTOTYPE DEVELOPMENT FOR COMBAT DOGS Although combat canine units have been utilizing wearable technology for years, augmented reality developers are still in the initial stages of the applied use for military dogs. This revolutionary system has passed the initial phase of official testing. But, as the U.S. Army trials augmented reality goggles for dogs continue, there are still two more critical phases to complete. Augmented reality doesn’t exactly function the same way for dogs as it does for humans. Humans rely on more audio and visual elements to communicate effectively, while animals are able to recognize more simplified cues. Instead of giving the dog a digital image of the trainer, augmented reality goggles give the dog one-dimensional commands. The purpose of this technology is to simplify the training tactics being used between the handler and animal, not to effectively replace in-person interaction. Also, using goggles that are outfitted with cameras allows handlers to see from the dog’s point of view. Soldiers can take advantage of the live feed that is being recorded via the dog’s AR headset, and they can help to guide the dog by sharing their actual perspective. In current applications, cameras are instead fixed to the dog’s back harness. Using the goggles to see from the animal’s perspective provides soldiers with more control, and a much higher level of visibility. Additionally, this positioning helps to stabilize the live video feed for a clearer picture overall. But, these capabilities will likely expand with more widespread adoption across different departments and command functions. [https://relaycars.gryffin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/image-126.jpeg] MAINSTREAM AR GOGGLE USE FOR MILITARY DOGS When it comes to the innovation and development of augmented reality for military service dogs, this is just the beginning. Current versions of this technology included a wired headset, requiring the handler to still be within close proximity to the subject. But, developers expect to bring a wireless version to the market in the next two years. Perfecting a wireless model will provide dogs and handlers with even more freedom and, in turn, safety while they’re out in the field. Eventually, real-life applications will help soldiers to obtain critical operation information, identify explosives, and evade enemy contact. Once a wireless model becomes available for general testing and production, U.S. Army researchers can work on enhancing the technology for different dog breeds and activity capabilities. Augmented reality is becoming an increasingly important part of mainstream technology, so it’s no surprise that the military is utilizing AR to improve day-to-day operations. Increasing safety by improving communication between military animals and their handlers has great potential to prevent dangerous incidents from endangering soldiers or combat dogs. Command Sight is just one of the leaders in this growing sphere, but augmented reality is certainly here to stay.

Museums Are Using Augmented Reality To Boost Entertainment Value

Museums Are Using Augmented Reality To Boost Entertainment Value

November 4, 2020

Museums are bringing new worlds to visitors like never before by using augmented reality to educate. Major museums, like the Getty Museum or the Louvre, have long been regarded as cultural epicenters. They are often frequented by thousands of tourists and locals every year. Today, museums are looking to not only educate and inform their visitors but also entertain and keep them engaged. This is especially true for smaller local museums that often do not get the same rate of visitors or revenue as major museums. The revolution of smartphones and tablets has meant that museums need to keep up with and integrate mobile technology into their exhibits. However, many museums are taking their technology a step further and incorporating augmented reality through games, apps, and recreating worlds with virtual reality. While using augmented reality and virtual reality as a form of entertainment might be new for museums, they often are already using such technology in their research and preservation methods. USING AUGMENTED REALITY TO RECREATE THE PAST Augmented reality is not necessarily new technology at this point, especially in the fields of research such as anthropology and archaeology. For many years now, augmented reality has been used to recreate worlds and artifacts that have vanished. Through augmented reality, researchers can discover more information about how past civilizations lived and can piece together more information about the past. It is often a tool employed especially in Egyptology and ancient archaeology, where much evidence is destroyed, incomplete, or missing. Artifacts that are destroyed or damaged can be scanned and turned digital so that researchers can try to recreate what the actual item could have looked like. One researcher is looking to adapt such advanced technologies into a more accessible version for tablets that can be a more cost-effective version of the technology so that researchers all over the world and average consumers can utilize the technology. AUGMENTED REALITY TO SMELL AND HEAR THE PAST Archeologist Stuart Eve is working to create an app that recreates ancient ruins as they originally looked. Eve wants to develop this even further and create an app that can also help users not just see what ancient ruins used to look like but also what they smelled and sounded like to give a truly immersive experience. Although a very rudimentary model now, Eve has developed an add-on of a tiny fan that would give off the smells that might have been present in the area and time period. A recording of the sounds of the area such as a crowded market or street would also be playing. Eve says that by using AR we can render simulations of the ancient world by using the real world as a canvas. Eve hopes that his device will further research and provide insight into how ancient peoples lived. This can help researchers understand how certain landscapes might have played a role in shaping civilizations and helps to give a more engaging and at-hand experience rather than just sitting behind a computer screen. [https://relaycars.gryffin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/image-120.jpeg] MUSEUMS ALREADY USING AR In addition to research, many museums are already using augmented reality for their visitor experience. * The Annenberg Space for Photography While the Annenberg Space has since had to permanently close its doors due to COVID-19, the small museum was once a gallery dedicated to using photography as a means to educate. In past exhibits, they utilized augmented reality and virtual reality to help enhance visitors’ experience. Its exhibit last year of photographs of Cuba and Cuban culture also included a virtual reality room where visitors could use VR goggles and feel as if they were standing in a busy street in Havana. * The Smithsonian Institute The famous Smithsonian introduced AR to help enhance the experience of one of its oldest and most famous exhibits. The museum’s Bone Hall has a massive collection of skeletons on display. Some have been displayed since 1881 and now they are coming back to life through the app Skin and Bones. First introduced in 2017, the app features 13 skeletons from the collection, and through the app, the creatures are reconstructed using superimposed images. Users can see how the animals would have looked and moved and can see the various layers of skin and muscle looks like over the bones. The app helps to educate visitors on how some extinct animals would have looked like and interacted in their environment. * The Cleveland Museum of Art Using augmented reality, the museum was able to bring a much more interesting and interactive experience for museum visitors. Using an app, visitors could view artifacts such as pottery as they once were in ancient times. * The Kennedy Space Center The ancient and extinct worlds are not the only ones coming to life through AR. The Kennedy Space Center’s Heroes and Legends exhibit is another great example of how AR can be utilized in museums to educate visitors about key moments in history. Using augmented reality, the exhibition uses holograms throughout to help visitors see and hear from actual astronauts talk about their work in their own words. * The National Museum of Singapore The museum used a game-like feature in their exhibit of the William Farquhar Collection of Natural History Drawings. Using an app on their phone or tablet, the visitors can explore the paintings and find plants and animals within the paintings. They can then add them to their virtual collection as they walk around the museum and they can learn facts about each plant or animal they find. * England’s Historic Cities While not an actual museum, England’s Historic Cities app is a great example of how augmented reality can help to promote and educate heritage sites in countries. Using the augmented reality app, visitors to the country can learn more about the famous heritage sites across the country such as the Roman Baths and Durham Cathedral. Famous historical figures like William Shakespeare act as virtual guides and information is superimposed onto the walls and artifacts at the sites. [https://relaycars.gryffin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/image-121.jpeg]Woman wearing vr headset augmented virtual reality in history city center. Concept of virtual museum. HOW TO GET VISITORS TO USE IT Museums everywhere seem to be embracing augmented reality as a way to revitalize their museums and enhance their visitor experience. However, it remains unclear if visitors are really embracing the technology themselves. PalaeoGo is looking into how museums, particularly natural history museums and national parks, can best implement augmented reality to their facilities. The group found that although many museums were using augmented reality through apps, it was not necessarily popular among visitors. They concluded that visitors were wary about downloading such a specific app that really only had use within the museum, and they were also concerned with data privacy. Museums can encourage visitors to download the app by: * Making it relevant outside of the museum – a big concern for users is that the augmented reality app will have no usage outside of the museum and will end up just taking up space on their smartphone or tablet. Incorporating other educational or game-like elements that can function outside of the museum can help to encourage them to download it and to continue to use it. * Gamifying its usage – Turning the app into an augmented reality game is a great way to get visitors to use it especially for children. This can help them have fun while at the museum and also helps to educate at the same time. * Being transparent with data usage – Before visitors download the app, it is a good idea to provide them with information about how their data might be affected. This includes letting them know about email subscriptions and offering an option to opt-out. Transparency about their information can help them feel more at ease with using the app. * Use it to advertise discount offers – An augmented reality app can also be a great way to encourage visitors to come back by offering discounts or deals if they download the app. Museums can also use the app to send offers to them. * Partner with another museum – Again, many visitors are wary of downloading an app that is limited in usage. To help encourage them to download it, museums can partner with one another to help make the app more versatile and is great for visiting tourists to be able to use the same app at different museums and sites. [https://relaycars.gryffin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/image-122.jpeg] AR AND OUR EVERYDAY LIVES Many aspects of our everyday lives are using augmented reality. Museums are one of many industries that are embracing augmented reality to help enhance their visitor and user experience. Everywhere you go bits of augmented reality are incorporated into our lives. Most smartphone users already have augmented reality apps like games or shopping apps. You can even use augmented reality to shop for a car as companies like RelayCars are making virtual showrooms the new norm. Shoppers at stores like Ikea and Target can see how a piece of furniture will look in their home before even purchasing it using augmented reality features on their shopping apps. Augmented reality is allowing us to not just enhance our real-world experience, but also is allowing us to visit the worlds of the past. Through augmented reality museums are bringing the past back to life and using it to educate a new generation in a way that keeps them engaged and curious.

How Honda is using Augmentative & Virtual Reality

How Honda is using Augmentative & Virtual Reality

November 2, 2020

The use of augmented reality and virtual reality technologies is expected to completely transform the automotive industry. These technologies have already been embraced by some companies in the automotive industry, including the Honda Motor Company. Over the last several years, Honda has started to incorporate augmented and virtual reality technologies into the creation, promotion, and use of their vehicles. Here are some of the many ways that Honda utilizes augmented and virtual reality technology: SHOWCASE NEW VEHICLES Honda is one of many automotive manufacturers that has utilized augmented and virtual reality technologies to introduce and promote new vehicles. At the 2017 Los Angeles Auto Show, the automotive manufacturer used augmented reality technology to introduce consumers to the redesigned Honda Accord sedan. Attendees were asked to put on a Microsoft HoloLens augmented reality headset. Then, they were presented with a brief history of the Accord sedan presented on an augmented reality timeline. The next part of the experience used augmented reality to show attendees how the design of the Accord has evolved over time. Attendees were able to see digital projections of the various designs. Then, attendees were able to sit behind the wheel of the new Accord sedan. Using augmented reality technology, Honda showed attendees how the vehicle’s new safety technology helped drivers navigate through dangerous road conditions. After this augmented test drive was over, attendees were able to learn about other features of the new Accord, including the turbocharged engine, Wi-Fi capabilities, and Honda Link app-based platform. Augmented reality technology was used throughout this portion to keep attendees engaged with the content. By the time the experience was over, attendees had learned everything they needed to know about the redesigned Accord. Augmented reality was also used to promote the new 2021 Acura TLX. To promote this vehicle, Honda launched the “Inside Track” campaign, which allowed consumers to use augmented reality to project a small version of the TLX onto their surroundings. Then, consumers could challenge their friends to a race through various environments, including the streets of a big city or windy roads on a mountaintop. The entire experience—from the small-sized TLX to the environment—was powered by the use of augmented reality technology. In this case, using augmented reality helped Honda create buzz around the TLX and engage with consumers in an interesting and compelling way. GIVE BACK TO THE COMMUNITY Honda used virtual reality technology in a way that many other automotive companies have not: to give back to the community. In 2018, the automotive manufacturer used virtual reality technology to create “The Magic Snow Globe” experience for patients at the Children’s Hospital of Orange County. The technology was used to transport kids inside a snow globe, where they could interact with various holiday-themed characters and other elements. For example, kids could work with the characters inside the snow globe to create a virtual snowman using virtual snow. Kids could also interact with virtual clouds in order to make it snow inside the virtual globe. Thanks to virtual technology, Honda was able to create an unforgettable holiday experience for the pediatric patients at this hospital. INTERACT WITH AUTO SHOW GUESTS Honda used augmented reality technology to make its exhibit stand out and appeal to more attendees at the 2019 Los Angeles Auto Show. Anyone who attended this event could visit the manufacturer’s exhibit to use the augmented reality photo booth, which the company called the “Honda Winning Moment.” Once inside the photo booth, attendees were able to take pictures of themselves participating in a selection of historical sports moments. For example, attendees could take photos of themselves celebrating with the National Hockey League winners of the Stanley Cup. Using augmented reality technology in this manner allowed Honda to interact with guests at an auto show in a unique way. It also created a memorable and fun experience for guests, who were able to take home photos of themselves as souvenirs. [https://relaycars.gryffin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/image-118.jpeg] ENHANCE THE PASSENGER’S EXPERIENCE Honda revealed its Honda Dream Drive prototype at the Consumer Electronics Show in 2017. This prototype, which is supported by virtual reality technology, was created in an effort to make riding in a Honda more fun and exciting for passengers. How does it work? Using a virtual reality headset, passengers would be transported to a virtual world. The prototype, which was created in partnership with DreamWorks Animation, took passengers to the fantasy world depicted in the studio’s animated movie Trolls. The motion of the vehicle triggers what the passenger experiences in the virtual world. For example, if the car accelerates forward, the passenger may start to glide forward through the virtual world. Honda Dream Drive has not been incorporated into vehicles yet, but if it is, it could completely transform how passengers experience riding in a Honda. [https://relaycars.gryffin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/image-119.jpeg] OFFER VIRTUAL TEST DRIVES Honda uses virtual reality technology to give consumers the opportunity to test drive certain Honda vehicles without ever visiting a dealership. This virtual test drive feature is available on most local Honda dealerships’ websites. To take a test drive, consumers simply need to visit a Honda dealership website and click on “Take a Virtual Test Drive.” To get the full experience, it’s best to visit the dealership website on a mobile device. Then, consumers will get to choose which vehicle they would like to virtually drive. After making a selection, consumers will get to watch a short video shot from behind the wheel of the vehicle. As the video plays, consumers can rotate their phone to explore the vehicle and its surroundings. This virtual reality test drive is perfect for today’s consumers, who typically start the process of searching for a new vehicle at home. BETTER SAFETY FEATURES In 2016, Honda quietly filed a patent for a new safety system supported by augmented reality technology. According to the patent filing, the system would use sensors placed around the outside of the vehicle to detect pedestrians in all directions. If a pedestrian is detected, the system would use augmented reality technology to display an avatar on the windshield. This would alert the driver of the location of the pedestrian to help them avoid a collision. Because the sensors detect pedestrians in all directions, the system would also improve drivers’ situational awareness by helping them locate pedestrians they otherwise would not have seen. Honda is far from the only automotive company that is taking advantage of these technologies. But Honda is one of the few companies that continues to find new and exciting ways to use augmented and virtual reality technology to stand out from its competitors.

7 Amazing Ways Marketing Reality was Augmented

7 Amazing Ways Marketing Reality was Augmented

October 30, 2020

Augmented reality is quickly becoming a “daily use” technology, especially as more comfortable and wearable devices hit the market. Affordable glasses or contact lenses could make what is now a novelty tech become as common as the smartphone. Just because it is still in the developing phase, doesn’t make this tech any less interesting to marketing firms. There has already been a significant increase in the use of augmented reality in games and the workplace. This market is an expanding one, and that makes it important for companies to include in their marketing. Augmented reality also has some significant usage statistics: * It can hold the attention of users * Interaction is increased (over other media forms) * Sales or conversion rates increase (likely due to the realistic experience and engagement) Right now, it has the ‘cool’ factor of being a fun and novelty technology that can create some impressive visuals and interactions. As technology develops, it is possible that conversion rates could reduce. For those already experienced in augmented reality marketing, this will mean needing to develop more unique ways of adapting this tech to attention-grabbing marketing campaigns. So, let’s take a look at some examples of how this can be done. [https://relaycars.gryffin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/image-114.jpeg] WEATHER – MAKING BORING ATTRACTIVE For some time, weather forecasters have used the green screen to try and add some interesting elements to their forecasts. However, mostly these have remained fairly dull. Augmented reality through a system called Max Reality makes the forecast far more interesting. It also adds an element of freedom, meaning that the reporter doesn’t need to be in a studio and can instead be at a different location for each report. It can add augmented reality elements, including clouds, 3D looking displays, or even instantaneously surround the presenter with flood water to give a clear view of how high water levels will be. [https://relaycars.gryffin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/image-115.jpeg] HOME DECOR Companies are using augmented reality to show potential buyers exactly how things would look in their homes before they buy. In most cases, this is achieved via an augmented reality app. The app allows the customers to see their home via the camera, with augmented changes as they are selected. In this case, they could put a lamp on the dining room table, or a sofa in the corner to see how it would look. It is even possible to test out paint or wallpaper colors before making any ‘real’ changes. This kind of app is fun but also fantastic at increasing conversion rates. This is because doubts are removed, or decisions made clearer, once the customer is able to see what the result will look like before they invest any time or money. [https://relaycars.gryffin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/image-116.jpeg] CLOTHES AND MAKEUP SALES People generally enjoy looking good. It is a driving force behind fashion and cosmetics. There literally couldn’t be a better way to convince someone to buy, than showing them how good they could look. With makeup and clothes, this is done through special photography apps or smart mirrors. Systems such as Modiface convince users by not only showing how they could look but also by adding additional information. They combine AI for “3D facial micro-feature tracking tracks movements and expressions through 68 non-identifying parameters” and augmented reality to show how new hair colors, makeup, etc. will look in real-time. Clothing companies are also doing similar, with smart mirrors that allow customers to instantly try on numerous styles and without ever needing to change clothes. It is convenience that sells! And, with the latest mixed reality technologies, the systems could even accurately measure clothing sizes. SHOE SALES Clothes and makeup are not the only fashion segments utilizing augmented reality in their marketing. Shoe and sneaker sales is a massive industry. It is also one that is fairly easy (compare to some) to market via augmented reality, Timberland provides its buyers with the simplicity of a virtual fitting room, allowing customers to ‘try on’ many styles instantly. Of course, as they produce a lot more than only shoes, this is a magic mirror style technology, but that can also be used from a phone or tablet. Footlocker, on the other hand, has brought their in-store marketing to life with augmented effects via a Snapchat AR advertisement. It is almost like you are seeing the stars of sports in the same room. AUGMENTED TOURS Visiting famous places is always on people’s bucket lists. While in some cases it’s a dream that will never come true, others just need the extra push to be persuaded to convert their dollars into experiences. Virtual tours are available for all sorts of major attractions, from football stadiums to the most ancient temples. However, these virtual tours often help to increase the desire to visit, leading to more sales. Of course, for those that could never afford the trip, they are also an amazing way to experience places that could otherwise remain forever unseen. CAR SALES – SEE YOUR DREAM Although virtual reality and augmented reality has been used throughout the automobile sector for a while, it is only recently that the front end of sales is starting to strongly adopt this technology. From virtual showrooms to augmented reality apps that put the car in front of your house, the possibilities are almost endless. In many dealerships, the option to view cars virtually is a nice added feature, especially for vehicles that are not in stock or currently on a waiting list. Augmented reality can also help sales staff to upsell easily, as it allows clients to see exactly what the added trim levels or features look like. Overlaid information assists further, by highlighting the key features, even allowing for examples of workings or exploded views of complicated areas (such as the engine). [https://relaycars.gryffin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/image-117.jpeg] THEATRES – MAKING DRAMA MORE DRAMATIC This is certainly not a new thing for theatres to be using, as AMC started with interactive posters quite some time ago. Their app not only allowed posters to suddenly deliver previews but also for customers to buy or ‘pre-request’ tickets to the movies that impressed them. Today, the ways that companies are marketing movies with augmented reality is inventive and interesting. From the Justice League Facebook effects to Jumanji experiences via Snapchat, the cinematic experiences are not only becoming more realistic, but more in-depth with added content and features. WHY IS AUGMENTED REALITY MARKETING SO EFFECTIVE? Augmented reality is about as close to being able to ‘create reality’ as it gets. Until there is a time when holographic images can be solid and the world becomes truly virtual, augmented reality is the next best thing. It works so well for marketing because it is both simplistic and ‘real’. Instead of needing to understand lots of technical things, or use controllers, etc., virtual reality simply changes what we see in the real world and grabs our attention by doing so. Mixed reality is also making augmented reality advertising both more interactive and accurate. Objects can appear as the size they would be in that actual environment, and they can interact through touch, motion, or even with other real objects in that scene. It allows customers to try, test, or experience the products they are interested in, without needing to commit to the purchase. As customers can test out things fully before committing, they are also more likely to be satisfied with whatever they do decide to buy later. For those without time, or unable to travel as easily, augmented reality also provides convenience. It can often be used on mobile phone devices or special headsets. As most people have a smartphone nowadays, this allows for augmented reality experiences from anywhere and by anyone with a phone. This technology also adds information to otherwise simple or uninteresting scenarios. Business cards and posters can pop with animations or information jumping out of them, and even showroom tours can have car information overlaid on the real world car viewing experience. It truly helps create an informed buyer! CONCLUSION When done in the right way, augmented reality is a great tool for marketing. It is useful for showing off a product, giving a sample experience of a place, or even to test driving a car. It also has good potential for the campaign to go viral. When done in a clever way, such as the advert for Shadowhunters above, it surprises people and makes them laugh. It truly can take your marketing audience out of their automated comfort zones and sit up to pay attention to what your campaign has to say.

An Overview and the Future of the Augmented & Virtual Reality Eyeglass Market

An Overview and the Future of the Augmented & Virtual Reality Eyeglass Market

October 29, 2020

Virtual reality and augmented reality have been downloaded into our lives and are now wired into our automobiles, apps, shopping experiences, and the games we play for fun. While virtual or augmented reality is even featured in modern hearable technology, glasses and headpieces have been the ubiquitous gateway to the virtual realm. The problem? Their bulkiness was more space-age awkward than out-of-this-world chic. Now, though, major players in the tech sector are upgrading basic eyewear with virtual features, and the future of the augmented and virtual reality eyeglass market illustrates how this technology will change the way we see the world. According to Forbes Business Insights, the augmented reality market is projected to swell to more than $65 billion by 2027. While the augmented reality glasses sector hasn’t necessarily dominated the market, this sector is expected to grow exponentially by 2027—with reports predicting 31 million units by 2027. Currently, the options for augmented reality glasses (vs. more basic ‘smart glasses’) are a bit limited for the average consumer. The future for this sector, though, is promising, and major players in the tech industry may be eyeing their options for smart eyewear and other types of eyeglasses that incorporate virtual reality or augmented reality. Here’s an overview of augmented and virtual reality in this market, a glimpse back at the past of virtual and augmented reality eyewear, and an eye on the future, too. AMAZON ECHO FRAMES Leading the tech pack, industry giant Amazon released its own smart glasses and introduced the world to its Echo Frames. These glasses don’t feature augmented reality elements in the sense that wearing them takes the user into any type of augmented or mixed reality world, but the frames are a game changer because of their Alexa compatibility. Echo Frames communicate with Alexa, and all the gadgets the virtual assistant may control within the home. Wearing the frames gives the user the power to command Alexa to send messages, make phone calls, or even perhaps brew the coffee. According to Amazon, the frames also only work for the specific user’s voice. This feature, Amazon notes, ensures privacy. It could also possibly deter thieves, as voice control—theoretically—wouldn’t allow another individual to take control of the glasses. RAY-BAN X FACEBOOK? Facebook announced that it would release its own pair of smart glasses in 2021, and the company’s new product “will have Ray-Ban branding.” No details about the capabilities were announced, but Tech Crunch noted that the glasses might not have full augmented reality features. The Verge reported that the glasses “…will not have an integrated display of any kind.” However, numerous sites—including The Verge—reported that Facebook may have eyes on a true augmented reality pair of glasses in the future. VUZIX BLADE Vuzix, however, offers a true pair of augmented reality glasses. The glasses feature capabilities that mix multiple tech elements into chic frames. Blade includes a camera, speakers as well as voice control. Augmented reality features for these glasses include the incorporation of digital instructions over daily tasks. Tom’s Guide reviewed the glasses and explained more about the tech features; users can see notifications from social media and read comments via their glasses, they can also view the weather forecast, receive messages from their phone, play a game and read lyrics to songs. EPSON MOVERIO Moverio glasses look more sleek, contemporary, and futuristic than the Blade. Think Max Headroom! However, the Moverio glasses are offered in numerous models; there is a model aimed at augmented reality developers (it is geared for pros creating AR apps for eyewear), another for flying a drone, one model is extra durable for industrial sectors, a model that heightens “visitor experiences,” and several other designs. With all the options, what type of Moverio is designed for the everyday user? Tom’s Guide discussed several augmented reality glasses on the market including the Moverio BT-30C, which, the Guide explains, allows users to view videos via a virtual screen that appears before the eyes. Moverio’s site describes this model as featuring a “Wearable display” that plugs into smartphones and tech devices via a USB. BOSE ALTO Sound and vision merge with Bose Alto. These smart glasses incorporate the clear Bose sound quality with…well…sunglasses. While not true augmented reality, the glasses are capable of streaming music and allowing users to take calls and communicate with virtual assistants like Siri. These are the glasses to wear on the beach and chill out while listening to favorite tunes, but users shouldn’t expect advanced capabilities like pulling up visions of weather forecasts. SPECTACLES BY SNAPCHAT Facebook may have augmented reality in its future, but Snapchat Spectacles combined vision with visionary. Spectacles are exactly what many Snap users would want in app compatible eyewear. These glasses include dual cameras that are perfect for capturing 3D ‘snaps’ and videos, too. Videos taken via these glasses also can be shared to YouTube VR. As these glasses were created by Snapchat, it would make sense that the app also offers 3D effects for images snapped with the glasses. [https://relaycars.gryffin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/image-111.jpeg] SPORTS-ENHANCING AUGMENTED REALITY EYEWEAR While augmented reality and smart glasses are often marketed to the typical consumer, there are companies that have developed eyewear specifically for sports and competitive athletes. Augmented reality has the capability to revolutionize training and to enhance an athlete’s competitive edge. Check out these glasses designed for swimmers, cyclists, and runners. VUZIX SMART SWIM® Smart goggles for swimmers don’t yet offer the option to project a virtual competitor in the next lane of the pool, but Vuzix has designed technology made for goggles that provide data and feedback for competitive swimmers. The Smart Swim® device (for the pool) connects the coach to the swimmer, shows times for each lap, records workouts, and more; the device also is offered for open water, and, according to the company’s site, this model includes info on pace, yardage, distance as well as other data. EVERYSIGHT RAPTOR These augmented reality glasses are designed specifically for cyclists. The Raptor allows cyclists to snap photos and videos, receive emails/texts and listen to music. According to the company’s web site, the Raptor also provides navigation (including maps) and also offers training programs. Raptor features Everysight BEAM™ technology, an augmented reality projection display. SOLOS WEARABLES Wearables provide data for cyclists in front of their eyes. Solos Wearables include run time, direction, heart rate, speed and power data. The glasses ensure that the race is never interrupted, with data available at all times. While Wearables were designed with cyclists in mind, they also can be used for runners too. Yes, these glasses also display missed phone calls! GHOST PACER Designed by two high school students, Ghost Pacer is the ultimate in virtual and augmented reality for runners. The glasses display a virtual running partner that can be set to outpace the user or maintain the runner’s own speed. Data can be sent to Strava and users also can race friends by utilizing run data from Strava. If a friend ran 13 miles in two hours, users can program this data into Ghost Pacer to create a virtual competitor whose speed is set utilizing these stats. [https://relaycars.gryffin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/image-112.jpeg] LOOKING BACK AT THE PAST: VIRTUAL REALITY AND AUGMENTED REALITY EYEWEAR RELICS While the choices of augmented reality eyewear products for the average consumer are somewhat limited, the selection was even more limited in past decades when this technology was just taking off in the consumer market. When we visualize virtual reality eyewear, we usually think of big bulky headsets. These massive headpieces were once the norm when users wished to enter the virtual world. Large headsets were used to project training simulations in various industries—like aviation—but headsets also were standard in virtual reality games. The earliest types of virtual reality date back to large panoramic paintings that depicted a full view of a particular scene. Generations later, consumers (including children) enjoyed a very humble version of virtual reality—the View-Master. These handheld devices allowed users to view images that seemingly came to life. A small disc contained numerous images that were changed as the user clicked a switch on the side of the device. Image discs could include popular cartoon characters or even animals. As the user clicked, the action appeared before their eyes. In the early ‘90s, game giant Sega introduced its virtual reality glasses. While this could have been the early introduction that gamers needed to really latch onto the virtual reality concept, these glasses unfortunately never hit the market. In 1995, Nintendo released a console with a virtual concept. Virtual Boy had a bit of a confusing name, as Nintendo’s Gameboy was the well-known handheld console. Virtual Boy wasn’t handheld, instead it was set atop a movable stand. Graphics were 3D and images were viewed by looking into the console; at the time, 3D graphics for a gaming console were a big deal. The console was sold at stores for $180, but the concept didn’t catch on with the public. Many years after the simple View-Master and the missed opportunities by Sega and Nintendo, Google Glass represented one of the better known mainstream attempts at augmented/virtual reality eyewear. Unfortunately, the design wasn’t incredibly streamlined and there were reported issues of privacy concerns—in fact Investopedia reported that bars sometimes banned the devices (which featured a camera). The insanely high sticker price also didn’t help sales or popularity. The Oculus Rift, which was launched in 2012, is still popular for its virtual reality headset design. However, you won’t find the average person wandering around town donning a Rift. These headsets plug into PCs and are popular among gamers…and perhaps even designers, too. The Rift is meant to transport users to the virtual realm, and its design—while streamlined—is still the traditional headset. The evolving concept of virtual reality headsets also has peered into design processes within various business sectors, including the automotive industry. Microsoft’s Hololens is a mixed reality headset that is used by businesses across many industries. Notably, Volvo partnered with Microsoft to use Hololens during the design process and became the first automotive company to utilize this technology in its “engineering toolkit.” During the Covid lockdowns, Ford’s executives also used virtual reality to preview design concepts. And, while the headsets remain a bit traditional in design, the graphics displayed within those headsets have transformed from pixelated obscurity to become a concise and precise replica of reality. [https://relaycars.gryffin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/image-113.jpeg] AN EYE ON FUTURE DESIGNS Smart eyewear and eyeglasses that incorporate virtual and augmented reality will likely become more commonplace. As new designs are introduced, the technology they offer also will become more diverse. While smartglasses incorporate virtual assistants, it is quite possible that newer glasses that feature virtual reality could take the virtual assistant into our eye line. Siri, Alexa, and Cortana don’t have a visual identity. But, in the future, they could appear to us as holograms. Maybe the user—the wearer of smart glasses—gets to control how these assistants appear. They could look like the user, a friend, a celebrity, or maybe future offerings will allow the user to design the image from a menu of options. Build your own virtual assistant! Industry leaders are not likely to give away their designs and ideas for future offerings. So what virtual or augmented reality features are included in new smart glasses are in the hands of designers and programmers. Visualizing messages, weather, and even maps, though, may be obvious augmented reality features. Looking at current eyewear products that feature augmented reality elements may be a predictor of what the future holds for newer products designed for the average consumer. However, each company may have its unique take on product design. Major players in the industry also would (hopefully!) want to ensure that a new offering would be compatible with other company products. For example, the Apple Watch typically can pair with many iPhone models. Consumer demand also may play a role in the design and functions of augmented reality eyewear. If the average person cannot understand how a product will benefit them or their lives, they likely won’t be willing to invest money into making a purchase. Glasses may need to enhance everyday tasks, simplify the mundane, and enrich the tech experience. And, of course, privacy issues cannot be an issue. Users likely don’t want to worry that the camera is watching them, that their data is being shared, or that their every move is being tracked. Businesses also probably wouldn’t be thrilled about having customers wearing cameras attached to their eyewear. Moving forward and peeking into the future of virtual and augmented reality eyewear, companies need to be cognizant of what didn’t land in the past. Gimmicks and fads also don’t always translate to sustainable sales; the future offerings need to help users simplify their lives, help guide their daily tasks, and enhance and enrich the tech experience. The most successful products also will likely sync to social media; Snapchat’s glasses, for example, helped enhance the user experience via the app. Perhaps this type of functionality needs to be inclusive of all future eyewear that boasts augmented capabilities. Augmented reality eyewear could transport users into social media sites, transforming the two-dimensional realm into a face-to-face experience. Perhaps these glasses could allow users to interact virtually via glasses. Maybe a post can turn into a real conversation. Perhaps a like becomes a real-life thumbs-up instead of an icon. The future of smart and augmented reality eyewear designs might be blurred in mystery, but the vision is clear and perhaps even…rose-tinted.

AR Brings Futuristic Holographic Display Tech To Our Real-life Vehicles

AR Brings Futuristic Holographic Display Tech To Our Real-life Vehicles

October 28, 2020

Hollywood has definitely played up our fantasy for futuristic cars that do it all. From Star Wars to Iron Man, the Hollywood version of automobiles in the future rely heavily on tons and tons of advanced augmented and virtual reality features such as holographic display tech. Those fantasies might not be too far fetched after all. Many major automotive companies are looking for ways to bring augmented reality (AR) dreams into real-life vehicles. They are reaching out to tech and startup tech companies to incorporate their innovative technology into commercial vehicles. It seems that the big hope in the industry is to create fleets of fully autonomous vehicles. There are some major automotive players like Ford and Tesla already piloting and using autonomous vehicles; however, many of them are still not producing them in a way that is available for mass production and consumption. While the dream of fully autonomous vehicles is still years away, companies are looking to use AR to enhance the driving experience for consumers. One way, AR is making actual progress in vehicles is through holographic display tech in the form of heads up displays. [https://relaycars.gryffin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/image-108.jpeg] EARLY HEADS-UP DISPLAYS TO HOLOGRAPHIC DISPLAY TECH Heads up displays are often depicted as extremely advanced technology and features in futuristic movies. However, the heads-up display (HUD) is not necessarily new or innovative. Heads-up displays were first created in World War II to help fighter and bomber pilots to focus on looking at the horizon rather than being distracted from looking at maps while in the cockpit. The technology and features that were created to help these war-time pilots we would now consider the heads-up display. These planes had not necessarily new technology incorporated, but actually used technology and adapted it to their vehicles. The true beginnings of the heads-up display as we know it now comes from these adapted fighter planes. Using radar technology, these specialty planes were equipped with a piece of glass right in front of the pilot that displayed the radar information used to identify targets, including an artificial horizon. However, these displays were not commonly used during the war and were reserved for specialized night flyers. POSTWAR ADVANCES Postwar engineers continued to improve and develop this technology for future military aircrafts as well as the commercial aircraft market. However, this development in technology also began to be adapted to automobiles as well. Automakers after the war, many of whom were veterans themselves, began incorporating this early version of a HUD into cars. In the 1960s, General Motors were among the first to develop sketches and drafts of a vehicle with a HUD. However, the actual implementation of a functioning HUD in a commercial car would not come until the 1980s. GENERAL MOTOR’S BREAKTHROUGH IN 1988 General Motors’ Fifty 1988 Oldsmobile Cutlass Convertibles featured a heads-up display that projected a digital speedometer and turn-signal indicators on the windshield for the driver. This advancement from GM was made possible through their acquisition of Hughes Aircraft in 1985, which allowed them access to technology that aircrafts were using and adapted them to their commercial vehicles. TODAY’S HEADS UP DISPLAYS Today, heads-up displays are commonplace among luxury vehicles and have come a long way from its original aircraft usage. Many vehicles that have a head-up display can project important driving information like its predecessors such as a speedometer and turn-signal indicators. However, many advancements to the display features have been created such as GPS-guided turn-by-turn directions, blindspot indicators, and even what song is currently playing. While current HUDs have much more information available and advancements, they still have limitations. For one, they can only display a two-dimensional image layered over the driver’s view on the windshield. Some HUDs might allow you to adjust the placement of the display pane, but, visually, there is not much advancement to the display, that might soon change. The next step in HUDs is holographic display tech. [https://relaycars.gryffin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/image-109.jpeg] WHAT IS HOLOGRAPHIC DISPLAY TECH? But, what exactly is holographic display tech? Essentially it uses augmented reality to overlay an interactive image in front of the driver and on the windshield. These advanced versions of heads-up displays would project more than just a speedometer and would encompass the entire windshield. It would display much more advanced imagery and information for the driver such as mapping and navigation, hazard warnings, and more. Holographic images can help to create a more realistic look to the images displayed and can provide more information that can help drivers. The goal for all of these tech companies is to create HUDs that go beyond just displaying flat images in front of the driver but creating depth in the projections. Depth would allow for the overlaid images to appear as if they are floating in the real world. Currently, HUDs only display a flat image. With holographic display tech, heads-up displays will be able to follow the exact view in front of the driver and graphics will actually curve with the actual curve of streets and will appear as if the images are part of the actual view of the driver not just laid over the windshield. They would enhance the driver’s view and driving experience to make it safer and more enjoyable, not merely display dashboard information. Today, consumers are looking to fulfill their car fantasies that they’ve seen in films. Many major carmakers are betting that Holographic display tech will bring those fantasies to real-life. Major automakers are making huge investments in tech companies to bring this technology to their commercial cars. [https://relaycars.gryffin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/image-75.jpeg] COMPANIES INVESTING IN AR VEHICLE FEATURES Envisics is just one of those tech companies that are getting million dollar investments from automakers to create holographic display tech that can bring advanced technology to the everyday driver. Hoping to be pioneers in HUDs, Envisics has been working with several major automakers such as Hyundai, General Motors, and Jaguar to bring holographic display tech to the masses. Envisics is currently working with higher end vehicles on the market to integrate this technology. Their initial work with Jaguar Land Rover is predicted to be available by 2023. They are also in the works with Hyudai to incorporate such technology to work with autonomous vehicles that are aimed for release in 2025. With such major investors and the demand for more augmented reality integration, Envisics has seen their valuation boost to over $250 million. Along with Evisics, other tech companies are getting into the market and collaborating with major automakers to try and be the first to incorporate more advanced HUDs to commercial vehicles. WayRay and Falcon AR are also working to create more advanced HUDs with holographic display tech. WayRay hopes to take it even further and allow for an entire windshield display that can be split for driver and passenger screens. The company is also playing with the idea of allowing advertising opportunities onto their displays much like social media dashboards on smartphones. The future of the automotive industry is clearly relying on augmented reality technology to help boost competition and increase sales. Holographic display tech could be in consumer’s grasp soon and is a way to test the waters for major automakers when it comes to integrating augmented reality into vehicles designed for mass production. But, there are also many other ways AR is being utilized in the industry today and potential for its future usage in the automotive industry. [https://relaycars.gryffin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/image-110.jpeg] FUTURE OF AR IN THE AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY Augmented reality might not necessarily be synonymous with the automotive industry; however, the two industries have found a natural and mutually beneficial relationship. The automotive industry is already using AR in many aspects. From car design to sales, augmented reality has found a lasting role in the industry. Many automakers utilize augmented reality in their design process to allow car designers to create and innovate easily and quickly. AR has become especially useful when it comes to the selling of commercial vehicles. Many dealerships have incorporated the technology to their online selling platforms. Using virtual showrooms, dealerships can incorporate augmented reality into their online buying experience. Potential buyers can browse and view available vehicles. However, this is far from just a normal online buying experience. Virtual reality companies like RelayCars are creating virtual showrooms that are creating a much more immersive and engaging online shopping experience for consumers. Virtual showrooms can allow buyers to view the inside of a vehicle as if they are actually inside the car. This gives buyers a chance to become familiar with a car before even stepping into the dealership. Automakers know that in order to increase sales and meet consumer demand they must innovate and move forward. Using AR and virtual reality, they can bring to life the car fantasies of Hollywood that consumers long for. They are already embracing ways to use advanced technologies to make our vehicle experience more interactive and immersive than ever before. From Envisic’s holographic display tech to RelayCars’ virtual showroom, augmented reality and the auto industry are truly pushing where technology will bring our world in the future.

How Ford is using Augmentative & Virtual Reality

How Ford is using Augmentative & Virtual Reality

October 26, 2020

Augmentative and virtual reality has long been talked about as the way that will propel the automotive industry into the future. More and more consumers are demanding for more enhanced safety and driving features in their vehicles. The demand for autonomous vehicles such as for ride-sharing services is also increasing. The way to get to this future for automobiles? Augmentative and virtual reality is how automakers are going to make these car fantasies reality. Many automakers are investing billions into tech companies that are hoping to create programs and tools to enhance future vehicles. Ford is one of those automakers that hopes that spending money on tech will help them build a stronger consumer base and put them at the lead in the race for autonomous vehicles. Ford is one of many leading automakers that are embracing augmentative and virtual reality. The automaker is utilizing new advances in technology in almost every aspect of their vehicles. From designing and manufacturing to selling and displaying, Ford is incorporating both augmentative and virtual reality features to help enhance their manufacturing and buying experiences. DESIGNING CARS In order to create a more efficient and streamlined design process, Ford has started using Microsoft’s augmented reality tech, HoloLens which can be used for commercial and industrial applications. For Ford, HoloLens has given their designers and engineers the ability to work together seamlessly to quickly create new car designs. Using holographic goggles, designers can overlay 3-D elements onto a clay model of a vehicle then quickly evaluate and create new car designs. For the most part, the program is only being used to work on details on a vehicle. The overall design of the vehicle is still done through clay modeling and then designers can manipulate, add, and alter detailed designs. They can work simultaneously with engineers to help streamline the process. According to Craig Wetzel, Ford’s manager of design technical operations, the process of designers implementing changes then sending it off to engineers then getting feedback than having to redesign is the main reason designing a new vehicle is such an arduous process. “That takes time, and we find ourselves out of phase there a lot. But placing engineering and design in the same space, a process we call co-creation, streamlines that interaction,” Wetzel says. The process not only becomes more efficient but allows for much more creativity, and according to Wetzel also makes the creating process much more fun for designers and engineers on the team. [https://relaycars.gryffin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/image-103.jpeg] DISPLAYING / SELLING CARS Ford is not only using augmented and virtual reality in their design process, but they are also implementing advanced technology into the way they display and sell their vehicles. In 2017, Ford demonstrated how augmented reality can be used in a way to help buyers experience the features of a vehicle from a whole new way. “Think of augmented reality as the blending of virtual reality with real life,” says Garett Carr, Ford global auto shows manager. “It’s like having x-ray vision with the power to take people deeper into our product and technology stories- it feels a little like magic.” Ford is betting on that augmented reality magic to help sell their vehicles in an innovative way. Through augmented reality, the cars appear transparent and show all the features hidden beneath the car. Offering viewers a high-tech view of all the inner workings and features of the Ford vehicle. Carr had mentioned that part of the challenges of selling and introducing a new vehicle at an auto show was that consumers were previously only able to view the outside of a car. They had no way to view the actual final parts of the inner workings of a vehicle. However, with the new augmented reality technology has allowed consumers to see anything and everything they want of a vehicle without having to wear headsets or even seeing it physically. Ford also displayed the use of virtual reality by creating a virtual space to display the new features of their vehicles such as the 10-speed automatic transmission on the F-150 and created a wind-tunnel effect over the Ford GT Supercar to exhibit the car’s active aerodynamics. [https://relaycars.gryffin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/image-104.jpeg] The overall experience allows consumers to get a more interactive and engaging experience when viewing new vehicles without having to test drive them. This helps consumers learn about the new features of a car and also allows Ford to gauge consumer wants and save on vehicle mileage on new models. These same technologies are similar to their virtual showroom where consumers can build and price their potential vehicles. You can get a complete view and pricing of the exact vehicle that you want. While the experience on their retail site might be a paired down version of their auto show display, it still helps consumers view a vehicle inside and out. This can help them make a more definite purchase when they finally do visit a dealership. You can even view how some cars would look in your driveway! Many Ford dealerships are also utilizing virtual reality to enhance their showroom experience online. Using programs such as RelayCars, dealerships can sell and display vehicles using a virtual showroom. Shoppers can view and see all the details of a vehicle before even stepping foot into a dealership. This can help sellers lock in sales right away as the buyer comes in more informed and likely more committed to buying or leasing a vehicle. MAINTENANCE AND TECHNICIANS Ford is also utilizing virtual reality to help with maintenance upkeep in cars and to assist technicians to repair vehicles, especially newer models that require more and more technological programming to repair. In a partnership with automotive supplier Robert Bosch, Ford will provide training for service technicians at dealerships to work on the new Mustang Mach-E electric crossover. This vehicle will include tech that many current technicians might not be trained to work with including a new high-voltage system. Auto repair technicians are starting to need to become computer programmers as well with the amount of software being implemented into vehicles today. However, Ford is working to make auto repair easier and quicker by outfitting their technicians with virtual reality programs that can help them identify problems on a vehicle and repair them quickly. Ford is also implementing them in training programs for technicians. This gives them a chance to see the actual details and understand the components and steps before working on an actual vehicle. Making new Ford technicians even more knowledgeable and experts before even working in the field. [https://relaycars.gryffin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/image-105.jpeg] IN-VEHICLE FEATURES & AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES While much of the augmented and virtual reality that Ford is introducing is relatively new, the automaker has been incorporating this very same technology into their vehicles little by little. Their vehicles include features that many automakers already implement such as rearview cameras to assist with parking, blindspot detection, and more. Eventually, the company hopes to introduce augmented reality to create a windshield dashboard that would help enhance the driving experience. However, Ford is also hoping to get their foot in the game with autonomous vehicles. The automakers have invested $1 billion in a startup tech company, Argo AI to help make autonomous vehicles a reality. Although the company hoped to have an autonomous vehicle service on the road by 2020, they have recently pushed that deadline to 2022. But the company has been testing pilot vehicles and programs in the meantime. As the demand for autonomous vehicles rises, the race to get their vehicles on the road relies solely on perfecting the technology. The most important feature when considering autonomous vehicles using augmentative and virtual reality is safety. A feature that Ford takes seriously and has prioritized in creating their cars. Ford might not be the only major automaker embracing augmentative and virtual reality, but they are certainly using the technology in innovative ways. Their use of the technology will likely have a strong influence in the automotive industry to utilize augmentative and virtual reality more regularly. Many dealerships already are following suit by using virtual showrooms that allow consumers to view more features of a vehicle from the comfort of their own homes. Companies such as RelayCars are helping consumers to view and purchase Ford vehicles before they even go physically to a dealership. A virtual reality showroom can help get consumers to learn more about a vehicle and helps them to make a decision quicker. Augmentative and virtual reality is changing the automotive industry for the better. It allows for more safety features in vehicles and also helps to keep the creating and manufacturing process of vehicles safer as well. Even repair technicians such as Ford’s are utilizing the technology to make their work safer and more streamlined. Although augmentative and virtual reality is still in the early stages of working with automakers, we are likely to see more innovation and influence of this tech in the field for years to come.

The New York Times & Facebook Announce Augmented Reality Driven Partnership

The New York Times & Facebook Announce Augmented Reality Driven Partnership

October 23, 2020

People often associate augmented reality technology with the gaming industry, but the truth is that this technology is used in many other industries as well. Augmented reality has been embraced by businesses in various industries, including healthcare, automotive, manufacturing, and retail. Now, it seems media companies may also be ready to use this technology to enhance the consumer experience and grow their businesses. The New York Times recently announced a multi-year partnership with Facebook to create “augmented reality driven reporting.” The two companies will work together to develop a series of augmented reality filters and effects that will be available to users on Instagram. The goal of this project is to help Instagram users connect with and gain a deeper understanding of The New York Times’ journalism. A HISTORY OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE NEW YORK TIMES AND FACEBOOK The fact that The New York Times and Facebook are working together may come as a surprise to some, given the rocky relationship that the two companies have had over the years. In 2017, Facebook launched Instant Articles, a feature designed to help media companies create fast, interactive stories that could be published directly on the social media website. The New York Times was one of countless other media companies to participate in the launch of this new feature. But it was also one of the first companies to pull out after coming to the conclusion that it was a one-sided deal that did not benefit the publisher. This isn’t the only time that Facebook and The New York Times haven’t seen eye-to-eye. The former CEO of The New York Times, Mark Thompson, lashed out at Facebook in 2018. Thompson criticized Facebook’s policies that characterized certain news stories as political or partisan content. The CEO argued that this policy failed to recognize the difference between politics and reporting on politics, which in his opinion, was harmful to journalism as a whole. Facebook may not have been responsive to these criticisms at the time, but recently, the company has taken a new interest in forging strong relationships with media companies. Last year, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg stated that the company was committed to doing a better job of supporting journalism. This partnership with The New York Times marks a step in the right direction if the company still wants to achieve this goal. [https://relaycars.gryffin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/image-100.jpeg] HOW WILL THE AUGMENTED REALITY PROJECT COME TO LIFE? Launching this augmented reality project has truly been a team effort for Facebook and The New York Times. The publisher’s in-house advertising agency, T Brand, has incorporated augmented reality technology into promotional campaigns in the past. But The New York Times did not turn to the T Brand team for assistance with this project. Instead, The New York Times created an Augmented Reality Lab within the company’s research and development unit to bring this project to life. The Augmented Reality Lab is operated by more than a dozen employees of The New York Times. The team at the Augmented Reality Lab are responsible for developing the filters and effects that will be used on Instagram. The filters and effects will be created using Spark AR Studio, which is a platform for developers that is owned and operated by Facebook. The teams from Facebook and The New York Times will collaborate throughout every step of the development process. Facebook will be working closely with the Augmented Reality Lab team to help them understand the best ways to utilize Spark AR Studio technology. In return, the Augmented Reality Lab team will provide Facebook with feedback on what features to add to Spark AR Studio and how to improve the overall user experience. Even though this project is a partnership, The New York Times has made it very clear that its staff will remain in full control of the editorial content featured on Instagram. This means Facebook will not have a hand in creating the content that is paired with these augmented reality effects and filters. Furthermore, The New York Times will have full control over the design of the effects and filters. In addition to allowing The New York Times to use its Spark AR Studio technology, Facebook will also be providing financial support to this project. However, the terms of the agreement have not been made public, so the amount of money that Facebook is investing into this project is unclear. [https://relaycars.gryffin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/image-101.jpeg] HOW WILL THE AUGMENTED REALITY PARTNERSHIP AFFECT THE USER EXPERIENCE? The augmented reality effects and filters developed by The New York Times will create a more exciting and engaging user experience for consumers. The full catalog of augmented reality effects and filters will be available on the @NYTimes Instagram page. To see the complete collection of effects and filters, users will simply need to visit the “effects” tab on the @NYTimes account page. By tapping on an effect or filter, users will be able to read small snippets of information about current events. The small snippets of information will be superimposed over backdrops created using augmented reality technology. For example, a user who visits the @NYTimes Instagram account may see that the first story found on the “effects” tab is related to air pollution. If the user taps on this story, they will be able to read small snippets of information regarding how the levels of air pollution have changed due to the coronavirus pandemic. These snippets will be superimposed over an augmented reality backdrop that shows polluted air in a major city. In addition to simply viewing the effects and filters in this manner, users can also overlay the effects and filters onto their own images and videos to share with their followers. This gives users the opportunity to create their own unique content using The New York Times’ augmented reality technology. Plus, it is an easy way for users to share information on newsworthy topics with their followers. Neither The New York Times nor Facebook has discussed how many effects and filters will be created as part of this partnership. But The New York Times has revealed that the first group of effects and filters that will be available will be related to air pollution, the California wildfires, and the 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage. WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF THIS PARTNERSHIP? The New York Times could benefit from this partnership with Facebook in a number of ways. First, The New York Times hopes that this will make journalism—and staying on top of current events in general—more exciting and appealing to consumers who otherwise would not be exposed to these topics. Encouraging users to create their own unique content and share it with their followers is a great way to introduce The New York Times to new consumers on Instagram. The publisher also hopes that the augmented reality effects and filters will help consumers connect with news stories in a more meaningful way. The technology has the power to transport consumers to another world and allow them to see what the story is about for themselves. They won’t have to visualize the devastating effects of the California wildfires, for example. Instead, the technology will help them see it with their own eyes in a way that photographs and video footage simply cannot. As a result, these news stories may have more of an impact on users. The partnership also solidifies The New York Times’ position as one of the most innovative companies in the news industry. Throughout the years, The New York Times has experimented with virtual and augmented reality on a smaller scale. But this project sends a clear message to competitors that The New York Times is not afraid to go big or go home when it comes to incorporating new technologies into their marketing strategies. [https://relaycars.gryffin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/image-102.jpeg] WHY IS THE NEW YORK TIMES AND FACEBOOK AUGMENTED REALITY PARTNERSHIP IMPORTANT? As previously mentioned, The New York Times has dabbled in the use of augmented reality technology in the past. But this augmented reality partnership with Facebook is noteworthy for three reasons. First, this partnership represents a massive expansion of the use of augmented reality technology in the media industry. Expanding the use of this technology in the media industry could introduce countless consumers to augmented reality for the very first time. This could drive substantial growth in the global augmented reality market in the years ahead. Second, The New York Times only used augmented reality technology on its own website in the past. This project marks the first time that The New York Times will publish content enhanced by augmented reality technology on other websites. By publishing this enhanced content on Instagram, The New York Times could transform the way that social media users consume news stories and other content. Finally, the partnership could help bring the tech industry and publishing industry closer together. If this partnership is successful, other media companies may be more inclined to work with tech companies to incorporate innovative technologies into the products and services offered to consumers. It’s too early to evaluate the success of this project, but The New York Times remains hopeful. In fact, the publisher stated that they hope to be able to create countless other filters for the Instagram platform in the future. But regardless of the outcome, this project is yet another example of how companies are using augmented reality to create a more positive consumer experience and grow their business.

Categories: Augmented Reality